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What is LUPUS

 

The medical condition called LUPUS, which includes Systemic Lupus Erythematous (SLE) and Discoid Lupus, is an autoimmune disease mostly found among Afro-Caribbean and Asian women mostly, and also within the age of 10 and 55 year of age.

In SLE, the body immune system attacks the connective tissues causing severe inflammation. In continues to attack the organs, brain, joints, and digestive system. While Discoid Lupus attacks only the skin.

Lupus can be hereditary or triggered by trauma, lifestyle, sun ray, and medication. To some, Lupus is just a daily nuisance, to some, it is fatal.

Lupus can easily mimic other conditions which complicates diagnosis and increase the chances of it going untreated. In non-western countries, the sickly condition of sufferers can at times be attributed to superstitious causes which consequently subjects them to a life of misery. Lupus has no cure yet therefore sufferers live in medications, medical care and love from family and friends.

Also called: SLE,  Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

An inflammatory disease caused when the immune system attacks its own tissues.
Lupus (SLE) can affect the joints, skin, kidneys, blood cells, brain, heart and lungs.
Symptoms vary but can include fatigue, joint pain, rash and fever. These can periodically get worse (flare up) and then improve.
While there’s no cure for lupus, current treatments focus on improving quality of life through controlling symptoms and minimising flare-ups. This begins with lifestyle modifications, including sun protection and diet. Further disease management includes medication such as anti-inflammatories and steroids.

Common
More than 100 thousand cases per year (Nigeria)
 
Treatment can help, but this condition can’t be cured
 
Requires a medical diagnosis
 
Lab tests or imaging always required
 
Chronic: can last for years or be lifelong
For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.
Sources: College of Medicine, University of Ibadan and others
Requires a medical diagnosis
Symptoms vary but can include fatigue, joint pain, rash and fever. These can periodically get worse (flare up) and then improve.

People may experience:
  • Pain areas: in the muscles
  • Pain types: can be sharp in the chest
  • Pain circumstances: can occur while breathing
  • Whole body: anaemia, fatigue, fever, or malaise
  • Hair: hair loss or loss of scalp hair
  • Skin: red rashes or scaly rashes
  • Mouth: dryness or ulcers
  • Also common: anxiety, blood in urine, butterfly rash, clinical depression, flare, headache, joint stiffness, photophobia, raynaud’s, swelling, water retention, or weight loss
For informational purposes only. Consult your local medical authority for advice.
Sources: College of Medicine, University of Ibadan and others.
Treatment consists of immunosuppressants
While there’s no cure for lupus, current treatments focus on improving quality of life through controlling symptoms and minimising flare-ups. This begins with lifestyle modifications, including sun protection and diet. Further disease management includes medication such as anti-inflammatories and steroids.

Medications
Immunosuppressive drug and Steroid
 

Lifestyle drug
Sunblock and Sun protective clothing
 

Consult a doctor for medical advice
Sources: College of Medicine, University of Ibadan and others

Our Strategy for Lupus Awareness Campaign

Our Core Strategy is to draw sufficient attention to the emerging disease in order to bring Lupus to the front burner of discourse in the health services sector.

  • The Core Strategy which is aimed at generating traceable data on in-depth background of the disease, infection rates, data on triggers and their corresponding effects and other such information, involves driving the conversation towards extensive research on the disease. This will be implemented either through the collaboration with an existing institution that caters for life threatening diseases or as a new institution that would service the need-to know and call-to-action response needed for such emerging diseases
  • Our secondary strategy is to craft narratives that profiles the disease and encourages sufferers to speak up on its debilitating impact on their lives. We will create a strategic Public Relations Campaign that will raise the awareness of both unsuspecting sufferers and those who already know, on what they can look out for, as well as how to manage any crisis.
  • We will develop and optimally communicate focused messages across multiple channels in various formats.

Key Influencers

  • Medical  Institutions
  • Key Government Functionaries
  • Celebrities  
  • Medical Practitioners
  • Lupus Sufferers

We aim by this campaign to do the following:

 

  • Advocate for the adoption of healthy lifestyle
  • Promote the establishment of data centres within hospitals
  • Promote engagements in more research on the disease
  • Create Awareness on the emerging diseases

CONCLUSION

Given the near insignificant rate at which the Lupus is taking off, it stands the risk of being ignored however, it cannot be denied that cases with its patterns of manifestations (Kidney, heart, lungs) are increasingly being experienced. Usually diseases like this run the risk of going unnoticed until they become of epidemic magnitude – but with appropriate preparation, fatality can be reduced. As it stands and given experiences with such diseases like Cancer, HIV, Lassa Fever and even the most recent case with Covid-19, the place of raising the awareness of the people cannot be displeased

It is then, only constructive that the basis for raising the consciousness of people be done with the confidence of availability of information, hence the proposition of the above stated approaches